IEP meeting for high school

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Devon Frye 2 years ago.

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  • #39840

    ADHDmomma
    Keymaster

    This discussion was originally started by user in ADDitude’s now-retired community. The ADDitude editors have included it here to encourage more discussion.

    Good morning!
    I have a son who is a sophomore in high school with ADD . The problem this year has been working with a brand new tutor (first job) who insists my son is lying , lazy and just does not want to do the work. My son is extremely literal and takes him a minute to process assignments, homework, etc. Our I.E.P meeting is coming up and I want to be well prepared as to how to have the best help possible for the tensing of high school, college, and throughout his life.

    He wants to do well. No child wants to fail. He needs help with explaining and hearing things correctly and time frames for assignments (he always thinks he has plenty of time and then is overwhelmed and frustrated). At home I have my son repeat things back to me just so we both know we are on the same page. I also have him work in increments of 10- 15 minutes so he is aware of how long it is actually taking him to do assignments. At school I am not getting this support.

    I’m past frustrated and feel he will graduate and still not have the skills needed to work with his A.D.D. What else can I do?

  • #41323

    Devon Frye
    Keymaster

    This reply was originally posted by user adhdmomma in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

    First, I would change tutors. The attitude of his current tutor is doing way more harm than good. He needs someone who understands ADHD and learning challenges.

    A timer even at school could help him with managing time and not stressing about how much time he does or doesn’t have. Something like the Time Timer gives a visual of how much time is left and is great for individuals who struggle with time blindness: https://www.additude.com/adhd/article/739.html. They even have a Time Timers smartphone app now, so he could be discrete with it.

    Ask that teachers ensure that your son has assignments by taking him aside and discretely having him explain what he needs to do and how he’s going to get started.

    Ask for breaks. It can be as simple as allowing him to walk in the back of the classroom for a couple minutes or even just put his head down and close his eyes for 3 minutes.

    Since it sounds like he has slow processing speed, ask for extended time and/or reduced assignments.

    Many high schools have a guided study hall for students with learning challenges. If that is available to him, definitely request it, but also request that he’s getting plenty of help not just with assignments and homework, but also with study, social, and life skills.

    Here’s more on accommodations for high school:
    https://www.additude.com/adhd/article/2533.html
    https://www.additude.com/adhd/article/6511-4.html

    Penny
    ADDconnect Moderator, Author on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen boy with ADHD, LDs, and autism

  • #41326

    Devon Frye
    Keymaster

    This reply was originally posted by user Wendi 01 in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

    Wow!

    Thank you so much! This had been a great help!

    I will go through the this and the websites more when I am home from work this evening.

    Thank you again, you have been a great help!

  • #41329

    Devon Frye
    Keymaster

    This reply was originally posted by user adhdmomma in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

    You are most welcome. It’s a long road, and knowing where to start is a big part of the battle. 😉

    Penny
    ADDconnect Moderator, Author on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen boy with ADHD, LDs, and autism

  • #41334

    Devon Frye
    Keymaster

    This reply was originally posted by user Dr. Eric in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

    Basically, the IEP is charged with addressing the barriers to educational access.

    If the issue is study skills, time management, etc…then, that should be where the goals and services should focus.

    Even though it may be enraging to her someone being dismissive of common ADHD issues, or use them as a reason to absolve themselves from their responsibility/job…“He has the ability. He just doesn’t apply himself…” (We have all heard every iteration of these.) The response should still be the same, “If that is the case, what is the plan to help him overcome it?”

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